February 8, 2017 - Alvaro Bedoya Speaks About Facial Recognition Technologies

On February 8, the Law School welcomed our own Professor Alvaro Bedoya, Director of Georgetown Law's Center on Privacy & Technology, for a lecture on the use of biometric identification and facial recognition technologies.

His lecture asked:  In a world where we have no (formal) reasonable expectations of privacy in public, what protections does the Fourth Amendment provide for your face and police technologies that track it? Does face recognition present the same challenges as other new tracking technologies - including "Stingrays" and drones -- or does it present something fundamentally different? Does the First Amendment protection us against the scanning of faces in a protest, or does it also provide few protections? And how should judges and policymakers address face recognition systems' apparent demographic bias in enrollment and accuracy?

Professor Bedoya appeared as part of Georgetown Law's Legal Studies Colloquium on Edge Technologies, a course taught by Professor Laura Donahue that focuses on new and emerging technologies that are transforming how we think about the law.

Alvaro Bedoya of Georgetown Law's Center on Privacy & Technology

Alvaro Bedoya of Georgetown Law's Center on Privacy & Technology